Woodcraft

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Kortoso
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Woodcraft

Postby Kortoso » Tue Jul 12, 2016 6:47 pm

I found this in Lord Baden-Powell's Scouting for Boys.
And I adapted it for Rangerish use.

Woodcraft is the knowledge of animals and nature.

You learn about different kinds of animals by following their tracks and creeping up to them so you can watch them in their natural state and study their habits.

The whole sport of hunting animals lies in the woodcraft of stalking, not in killing them.

No Ranger willfully kills an animal for the mere sake of killing but only when in want of food — unless the creature is harmful. By continually watching animals in the open, one gets to like them too well to shoot them wantonly.

Woodcraft includes, besides being able to see the tracks and other small signs, the power to read their meaning, such as at what pace the animal was going, whether he was frightened or unsuspicious, and so on. It enables the hunter also to find his way in the Wilds. It teaches him which are the best wild fruits and roots for his own food, or which are favourite food for animals, and, therefore, likely to attract them.

In the same way in inhabited places you read the tracks of men or horses and find out from these what has been going on. You learn to notice, by small signs, such as birds suddenly starting up, that someone moving near, though you cannot see him.

By noticing the behaviour or dress of people, and putting this and that together, you can sometimes see that they are up to no good. Or you can tell when they are in distress and need help or sympathy - and you can then do what is one of the chief duties of a Ranger, namely, help those in distress in any possible way you can.

Remember that it is a disgrace to a Ranger, when he is with other people, if they see anything, near or far, high or low, that he has not already seen for himself.
There are no safe paths in this part of the world. Remember you are over the Edge of the Wild now, and in for all sorts of fun wherever you go.
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Manveruon
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Re: Woodcraft

Postby Manveruon » Wed Jul 13, 2016 12:35 am

Beautiful stuff right there! Thanks Kortoso!
I'm afraid I cannot claim any of these skills in truth (or at least not a high degree of competence in them), but I do feel this nicely encapsulates the code and responsibilities of a ranger.
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Harper
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Re: Woodcraft

Postby Harper » Wed Jul 13, 2016 12:50 am

I seem to recall reading the original as a boy.

This is a good adaptation.

Thanks for sharing.
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Kortoso
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Re: Woodcraft

Postby Kortoso » Wed Jul 13, 2016 8:01 pm

Thank you, gentlemen.
There are no safe paths in this part of the world. Remember you are over the Edge of the Wild now, and in for all sorts of fun wherever you go.
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caedmon
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Re: Woodcraft

Postby caedmon » Thu Jul 14, 2016 6:59 am

Since we're on the topic, ever look into E.T. Seton's works?
-Jack Horner

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Impression: Boater Wesman ( Balku'npâ Adúnerama ) bronze founder living in Archet, Breelander of mixed dúnedain descent. c. 3017
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Kortoso
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Re: Woodcraft

Postby Kortoso » Thu Jul 14, 2016 10:49 pm

Yes. He brought Baden-Powell's scouting to the New World as it were. There are a few of his works available free on-line, as I recall.

I wanted to stick to Baden-Powell's as it had a British flair and it's what a young Tolkien might have learned in his time.

I'd like to go into more detail about reading tracks and so on. All in good time.
There are no safe paths in this part of the world. Remember you are over the Edge of the Wild now, and in for all sorts of fun wherever you go.

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